Tag Archives: e-learning coach

ePortfolio Series – Episode 2: What Are Available Platforms at U of C?

There are mainly two platforms available at U of C which are specifically tailored for ePortfolio:

UCalgary ePortfolio:

UCalgary ePortfolio is your personal flexible digital space for reflecting, documenting, representing, collaborating, and sharing your learning. You can decide what to collect here such as documents, graphics, audio files, videos, presentations, course work, etc. But these collections are much more than a bunch of stuff. It’s about organizing what you collect to show a process of learning over a period of time. It can also relate to your participation in specific academic fields or experiences outside of your academic career.

Instructions to create your ePortfolio site on UCalgary ePortfolio can be found here.

If you have any question, please email: tiapps@ucalgary.ca

D2L  ePortfolio:

Demonstrate life-long learning and capture your personal and academic achievements with the D2L ePortfolio, which is a personal portfolio tool for storing, organizing, reflecting on, and sharing items that present your learning. You can include documents, graphics, videos, audios, presentations, etc. that showcase your gain skills and qualifications in certain area. You can decide what items you want to include in your ePortfolio, how you want to organize them, and who you want to share them with. Through D2L ePortfolio you can create artifacts (individual items), collections (groups of items), reflections (thoughts on your learning), and presentations (private website showcasing your achievements). All these items can be shared with others by providing them with permission to view, comment on, assess and edit.

The D2L ePortfolio document will walk you through a series of screenshots that will help you to build an ePortfolio in D2L, where you can begin to reflect on your learning journey over time. You can download ePortfolio in D2L User Guide Basic here.

Nurse in Translation

My name is Teya and I’ve been acting as the e-Learning Technology Coach for the Cumming School of Medicine. In real life, I work as a Registered Nurse at the Foothills Hospital, fresh out of the nursing program at the University of Calgary. Nurses often act as translators between patients and physicians, and in this position, I’ve been attempting to translate progressive technology to new users. OpenLabyrinth is a virtual scenario and education research platform that medical professionals can use to create case studies for students. Students can test out their clinical decision making skills as they navigate an interactive “choose your own adventure” style of learning.

While OpenLabyrinth is incredibly powerful with many unique features and limitless possibilities, it isn’t entirely user friendly. It’s producers found that once they could get new users over the initial “technology adoption hump” they could use the technology successfully. I had the pleasure of working with the brilliant Dr. David Topps, Medical Director of the Office of Health and Medical Education Scholarship (OHMES). As the consortium lead, he knows every intricacy and idiosyncrasy of OpenLabyrinth. I came on as a set of new eyes with the task of helping new authors pick up the technology a little easier and get over that first “hump.”

I began by teaching myself how to use the program through arduous trial and error, sympathizing greatly with new users. Once I had the hang of it, I had to decide on the best mode to translate this technology for new users. Enter the one and only, Leanne Wu, the tech-savvy queen of the Taylor Institute for Teaching and Learning. With her help and some networking with e-Learning Coaches from other faculties, I learned how to use the program Snag-It to video capture my screen while I talked through some of the starting functions of OpenLabyrinth. This method worked particularly well to have the visual prompts alongside my audio instruction. A sample video will be posted when editing is complete!

I was asked to do this project because my clinical background as a nurse and limited (zero) knowledge of the OpenLabyrinth technology. It was challenging and rewarding work to learn the program and hopefully make adoption of the technology easier for new users. This is just one way that the Taylor Institute uses technology to support teaching and learning at the University of Calgary. Keep an eye on this blog to read about many more!